Recipe: Easy Weeknight Roast Chicken with Root Vegetables

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You know what pre-dated Pinterest fails? Recipe fails.

I’ve had my fair share of ’em, which is why I’m excited to share this practically-foolproof winter meal with roasted root vegetables.

If you’re feeling timid about working with a whole chicken, just ask the butcher to butterfly it for you at the store. Believe me, there’s nothing quite like these veggies, which soak up all the yummy juices from the skin and flavor from the bones!

Easy Weeknight Roast Chicken with Root Vegetables

Ingredients:

  • 3-4 lb. chicken, butterflied open
  • 5-6 small potatoes
  • 3-4 small beets
  • 2 carrots
  • 3 celery stalks
  • 1 medium onion
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • 1 Tbsp rosemary
  • 1 Tbsp thyme
  • 1 Tbsp sage
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Lemon

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F, and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Wash and/or peel and roughly chop potatoes, beets, carrots, celery, onion and garlic.
  3. Spread veggies out on baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil and half of the seasonings.
  4. Lay chicken on top of veggies, drizzling with more olive oil, and sprinkling on the other half of the seasonings. Slice lemon and place a few slices on top.
  5. Bake in oven for 50-60 minutes or until juices run clear and a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part reads 165 degrees F.
  6. Transfer chicken to a cutting board to rest for 10 minutes, and return the veggies to the oven to crisp up for 5-10 more minutes.
  7. Plate on a platter with veggies on the bottom, chicken on top, and garnish with a squeeze of roasted lemon.

Try not to overcrowd the vegetables in the pan; the more room you leave between them, the more they’ll cook evenly through.

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If you want an even juicier bird, rub it with the seasonings and an extra tablespoon of salt the night before, allowing it to soak everything up overnight in the refrigerator.

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You’ll know the veggies are done when they’ve got a nice caramelized glaze on them and you can pierce them easily with a fork.

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Even after the chicken skin browns up, you’ll want to check the underside to make sure it’s done; the first time I made this recipe, some of the thicker parts needed more time to cook through.

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Special occasion? Serve with a nice light red or creamy white wine, and enjoy!

10 hot nutrition trends for spring

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Spring is a great time to kick-start healthy eating habits.
Photo credit: EatRight.org

We wrote previously about tips for spring cleaning your workout routine, but that’s only half the equation for healthy living; feeling (and looking!) good requires a balanced diet in addition to regularly moving your body.

So for some ‘food for thought,’ below are 10 of the most buzz-worthy nutrition trends for spring, care of the folks at Western Athletic Clubs.

1. The Paleo Diet means eating only what people did in Paleolithic times, including a whole-food diet of fruits and vegetables, animal proteins, nuts and seeds – but no processed foods, dairy or gluten

2. Hunting/Foraging is for those who want to know exactly where their food comes from (the farm, soil, etc.) and can take the form of gardening, preserving, hunting and more

3. Acidic/Alkaline nutrition opts for a less acidic diet by maintaining a neutral pH level of 7.4. This is achieved by increasing vegetable intake and decreasing processed sugars

4. Coconut Oil is a saturated fat with properties, such lauric acids, that aid in digestion and in the protection of the body against fungus and bacterial infections

5. Coconut Water is unlike coconut milk or oil in that it has no fat, few calories and is very high in potassium. Many athletes use it as a replacement for sugary sports drinks

6. A Low Inflammatory Diet eliminates certain foods that can cause inflammation of the body, affect weight, joint pain, hormones, digestion and autoimmune issues

7. The Grass-fed Beef movement means eating meat from cows that are 100 percent grass fed (no corn) because it is lower in total fat and has a high Omega-3 profile

8. Eating right for Your Digestion can help people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), for example, by decreasing sugar to limit bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine

9. A Low Fructose diet is popular with people combating weight gain, diabetes and inflammation because it eliminates high fructose corn syrup and similar processed foods

10. Finally, Gluten-Free diets eliminate gluten that’s found in wheat, barley and rye for individuals with allergies to it, as well as people who are experiencing related inflammation, poor digestion and weight gain